Maine Registry of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA Registry)

CNA Definitions

Abuse
For the purposes of the CNA Registry, abuse means the willful infliction of injury, unreasonable confinement, intimidation, or punishment with resulting physical harm, pain or mental anguish. 42 C.F.R. §488.301.
 
Annotation
An annotation is information on the Registry about criminal convictions and substantiated complaints. There are 2 kinds of annotations: non-disqualifying annotations and disqualifying annotations.
 
Annotation/disqualifying
A disqualifying annotation is information about you on the CNA Registry concerning certain criminal convictions or any substantiated complaint. A disqualifying annotation bars you from working as a CNA or as an unlicensed assistive person (UAP) in Maine.
 
Annotation/non-disqualifying
A non-disqualifying annotation is information about you on the CNA Registry concerning certain criminal convictions. You may work as a CNA in Maine with non-disqualifying annotations
 
Certificate of Equivalent Training
A document issued by the director of a nursing school that documents satisfactory completion of nursing school classes that are at least equivalent to the hours and course content required by the Maine approved CNA training program. It identifies the course content and the classroom and clinical practice hours completed by the nursing school student. Based on the certificate of equivalent training, the Registry determines whether the nursing student is qualified to be placed on the Registry without further competency testing.
 
Certificate of Training
A Certificate of Training, or its equivalent, is a document issued by the CNA training program to an individual who has satisfactorily completed an approved training program and competency test. The certificate includes the dates of training; the number of classroom and clinical hours; and the date the certificate was issued.
 
Certified residential medication Aide (CRMA)
A trained person who is certified to provide medication administration in a residential setting.
 
CNA
A Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) is a person listed on the CNA Registry who performs selected nursing services under the supervision of a registered professional nurse. A CNA is a person who has successfully completed a Maine training program and holds a Certificate of Training, or a person who has been comparably trained in another jurisdiction or otherwise meets Maines eligibility requirements for listing on the Registry.
 
CNA Bridge Examination
Maines CNA Bridge Examination is a competency testing process taken by CNAs trained in another jurisdiction who want to work as a CNA in Maine. A completed Bridge Examination application form must be submitted to the Maine Registry, with the following required documentation: a) Successful completion of an approved out-of-state CNA training program of not less than 100 hours that complies with the federal CNA laws. b) Employment as a CNA for at least 32 hours per week for 3 out of the past 5 years. c) At least 16 years old, and completion of at least the ninth grade of school (high school graduation or high school equivalency diploma preferred). d) Ability to read and write English.
 
CNA competency test
The Maine CNA competency test is a 2-part test including a written or oral examination, and a skills demonstration test.
 
CNAs employed by nursing facilities
There are federal requirements that apply to CNAs working in a nursing facility. Free training: an individual who is employed by, or who has received an offer of employment from, a nursing facility on or before the date the individual begins a CNA training program or competency evaluation, may not be charged for any portion of the program (including any fees for textbooks or other required course materials). Reimbursement for training costs: a CNA who becomes employed by, or receives an offer of employment from, a nursing facility not later than 12 months after satisfactory completion of a CNA training program or competency evaluation, may be eligible for reimbursement by the nursing facility for costs incurred for the training program or competency evaluation. For more information, speak to your employer. Ongoing in-service education. Nursing facilities must provide CNAs with no less than twelve (12) hours per year of in-service education. The nursing facility gives the CNA documentation of completed in-service education. Keep this information with your important papers. You will need it when you renew your listing on the Registry.
 
CNA federal law
The federal CNA law is the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA 87). Federal law required each state to have a CNA Registry, and established federal minimum requirements for CNA training programs and competency evaluation testing. 42 C.F.R. 483.150-158.
 
CNA Registry
The CNA Registry is a registry maintained by the Division of Licensing and Regulatory Services, that contains a list of active CNAs who are qualified to work in Maine, and a list of inactive CNAs who do not qualify for employment as a CNA in Maine at this time. The Registry also contains the following annotations: criminal convictions as required by law, and documented findings by the state survey agency of substantiated complaints of abuse, neglect, or misappropriation of property of a patient, client or resident.
 
CNA Skills List
The Official CNA Skills List is a list of specific tasks that CNAs are allowed to perform under the supervision of a registered professional nurse once the CNA has demonstrated an ability to successfully perform the task. Before the CNA demonstrates this ability, the CNA may not perform the task. If a task is not on the official CNA skills list, the CNA may never perform that task. The official CNA skills list was developed and is updated by the Maine State Board of Nursing and the skills list is Appendix B of the Prescribed Curriculum Of Nursing Assistant Training Programs (pdf*)
 
CNA training program/Maine
Maines approved CNA training program is 180 hours including 90 hours of classroom theory, 20 hours of clinical laboratory work, and 70 hour of supervised clinical practice.
 
CNA training program/out-of-state
An approved out-of-state CNA training program meets the minimum requirements for CNA training programs and competency testing established by federal CNA law.
 
CNA-M Course
Medication administration is a complex nursing task performed under the direct on-site supervision of a nurse by experienced CNAs who have completed the CNA-M course. CNA-Ms may work in nursing facilities, state mental health institutions, county jails, state correctional facilities and assistive living settings.
 
COGFNS. The Commission of Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (COGFNS).
If you applied to COGFNS to have your credentials reviewed, you may already have a packet of most or all of the information that you must submit with your application form. If you are from a non-English speaking country, COGFNS had you undergo the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Include a copy of your COGFNS packet with your completed application form.
 
Crimes: Maine Class D or Class E crimes
In Maine, a Class D criminal offense is any criminal offense for which the maximum period of incarceration is a definite period of less than one year, a fine up to $2000, or both. In Maine, a Class E criminal offense is any criminal offense for which the maximum period of incarceration is a definite period not to exceed 6 months, a fine up to $1000, or both. For similar crimes committed in other jurisdictions, the Maine CNA Registry applies 17-A M.R.S.A. 4-A (3) (D) and (E).
 
Criminal background check
A criminal background check is the examination of an individuals criminal history record, including convictions, that is obtained from the Maine State Bureau of Identification or its equivalent in other jurisdictions. Criminal background checks are done on all names the individual has used. For example, the individuals maiden name and name after marriage, if different. CNAs trained in Maine receive a copy of the criminal background check that was secured by the training program as part of the admission process.
 
Criminal convictions
Include (A) any conviction for a crime committed in a health care setting; (B) convictions within the last 10 years for a crime for which incarceration of 3 years or more may be imposed; or (C) convictions for a crime involving sex assaults, abuse, neglect or exploitation within the last 10 years for which incarceration of less than 3 years may be imposed. Criminal convictions include crimes committed in Maine and in other jurisdictions.
 
Employment restrictions
prohibit an individual from working as a CNA in Maine. Restrictions are based on certain criminal convictions and all substantiated complaints. Some restrictions are permanent and some are for a specific time period.
 
Employment/qualified
Qualified employment is employment in a health care setting, under the supervision of a registered professional nurse, that can be applied to meet the minimum work requirement of 8 hours within 24 consecutive months that is needed to stay on the Registry. Failure to work the minimum hours will result in removal from the Registry.
 
Exploitation
is the illegal or improper use of an adults money or property for another persons profit or advantage. Examples of exploitation include: 1. forcing an adult to change a will or sign over control of assets 2. forcing an adult to sell or give away property or possessions 3. keeping an adults pension or social security check.
 
Fraudulent Application
An application is fraudulent when an individual knowingly submits an application form or renewal form that contains misrepresentations concerning qualification for listing on the CNA Registry or in any way attempts to obtain placement on the Registry by deceitful or fraudulent means.
 
Health care settings
Include hospitals, nursing facilities, home health agencies, and assisted housing programs.
 
Medical assistants
perform tasks under the on-site delegation of the physician. A CNA is not a medical assistant.
 
Misappropriation of property
For the purposes of the CNA Registry, the misappropriation of property of a patient, client, or resident means the deliberate misplacement, exploitation, or wrongful temporary or permanent use, or damage, of belongings or money, or both, without consent.
 
Misrepresentation
includes, but is not limited to, giving false information; or the nondisclosure of criminal convictions by an applicant or CNA by failing to submit copies of court records or detailed information about each conviction
 
Neglect
For the purposes of the CNA Registry, neglect means a failure by inattentiveness, carelessness, or omission to provide for a patients, clients or residents needs, that threatens a patients, clients or residents health or welfare by physical or mental injury or impairment.
 
Nurse
A nurse is a person who graduated with a diploma, Bachelor of Science Degree, or Associates Degree in nursing or who completed a practical nurse program
 
Nursing school training
is satisfactory completion of training that is at least equivalent to Maines approved CNA training program requirements. Qualified nursing school students are issued a Certificate of Equivalent Training by the director of the nursing school. This certificate qualifies the student nurse to be placed on the Registry without further testing, if the Registry finds the individual is competent to function as a CNA.
 
Personal support specialist (PSS)
A trained a unlicensed assistive person (UAP) who has successfully completed the Maine PSS training that qualifies the individual to provide direct support to consumers in assisted living programs, residential care facilities, adult day services programs and home care settings. A minimum of 50 classroom hours of training is required.
 
Petition for Reinstatement after fraudulent application
No sooner than twelve (12) months after removal from the active Registry list based on a fraudulent application or renewal, an individual may submit to the Registry a completed Petition for Reinstatement after fraudulent application form You must: (A) prove that you were removed from the Registry based on only one application that resulted in a finding of misrepresentation, deceit or fraud; and (B) submit a new, updated application form for placement on the Registry. Reinstatement will be permanently denied if removal from the Registry is based on more than one fraudulent application.
 
Petition to Remove an Annotation of Neglect
A CNA with a one-time finding of neglect may petition the Department to remove the annotation of neglect 12 months after the date the finding of neglect was entered on the Maine Registry, if the finding of neglect was a singular occurrence and the employment and personal history of the CNA does not reflect a pattern of abusive behavior or neglect. The CNA must send the Registry a completed Petition for Removal of a Finding of Neglect form.
 
Proof of employment
Official documented proof of employment is a letter sent to the CNA Registry by former employers on their company letterhead that identifies the time period an individual worked for them as a CNA.
 
Renew your listing on the CNA Registry
The first time you are listed, you may have to submit a renewal form in less than 24 months, depending on your birth date. After that, you must submit a renewal form on or before your birth date every 24 months. Failure to submit a renewal form shall result in immediate removal from active status on the Registry. You may not work as a CNA until you are reinstated on the Registrys active status. Generally, you can be reinstated on the Registrys active status by submitting a completed renewal form.
 
Request a hearing
To appeal the decision, you must submit a completed request for a hearing form to the Registry within 30 days after you receive the decision. You must specify the reasons for the appeal. The hearing process is governed by the Maine Administrative Procedure Act (5 M.R.S.A. 8001 et seq.) and the department's Administrative Hearings Regulations (10-144 C.M.R. Ch. 1) (word*)
 
Sex assault
includes a number of crimes that are identified in Title 17-A, Maine Revised Statutes, Chapter 11 (word*); crimes involving sexual exploitation of minors that are identified in Title 17-A, Maine Revised Statutes, Chapter 12 (word*); or a crime in another jurisdiction for substantially similar conduct.
 
Standardized Medication Course for Certified Nursing Assistants
teaches CNAs to administer selected noninjectable medications to patients who are 4 years of age or older. Experienced CNAs may be eligible to take this course to become CNA-Medication Aides(CNA-M). The medication course is approved by the Maine State Board of Nursing.
 
State surveyor
means an employee of the Division of Licensing and Regulatory Services (survey and certification unit) who investigates a complaint that has been made against a CNA. Only state surveyors are authorized to investigate complaints of abuse, neglect, or misappropriation of property that have been made against a CNA. When a complaint is verified after an investigation by a state surveyor, it is called a substantiated complaint
 
Substantiated complaints
are those complaints that were investigated and substantiated by the state survey agency involving abuse, neglect or misappropriation of property in a health care setting. Substantiated complaints are placed on the Registry and remain on the Registry permanently. A CNA with a substantiated complaint annotation may not work as a CNA or a UAP in Maine.
 
Unlicensed assistive person (UAP)
means an individual employed to provide hands-on assistance with activities of daily living to individuals in homes, assisted living programs, residential care facilities, hospitals and other health care settings. Unlicensed assistive person" does not include a certified nursing assistant employed in the capacity of a certified nursing assistant. Substantiated complaints of abuse, neglect or misappropriation of property are employment restrictions that prohibit employment as a CNA or as an unlicensed assistive person (UAP). A CNA with employment restrictions is barred from employment as a UAP.