Maine Registry of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNA Registry)

Frequently Asked Questions

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On Line Forms

1. Are CNA Registry forms available online? (application, renewal, etc) Show/Hide

Yes. Click and print.

Hardcopies of the following forms are available by calling the CNA Registry at 624-7300 or send your request via e-mail to: dlrs.cnaregistry@maine.gov;

  • Bridge Examination Application form.
  • CNA-M Application form.
  • Certificate of Equivalent Training form
  • Competency Testing Application form.
  • Petition for Reinstatement After Fraudulent Application form.
  • Petition for Removal of a Finding of Neglect form.
  • Provider Confirmation of a CNA’s Listing, Hire or Termination form.
  • Reciprocity form.
  • Renewal form.
  • Request a Hearing form
  • Request for Temporary Listing on the Registry form.

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Placement on the CNA Registry

2. Do I have to be on the Registry before I can work as a CNA in Maine?Show/Hide

If you are not on the Registry, you cannot work as a CNA in Maine. However, there is an exception and a temporary listing provision. There is an exception: you may work as a CNA in a nursing facility for a maximum of 4 months if you are not listed on the CNA Registry, if you send the registry documentation of satisfactory participation in an approved CNA training program. Temporary listing provision: you may request temporary listing on the Maine Registry, pending completion of the Bridge Examination, if you received training in another jurisdiction. If approved, the temporary listing is for a maximum of 4 months and may not be renewed.

3. Do I have to pay to be listed on the Registry? Show/Hide

No. Federal CNA law prohibits Maine from charging an applicant or a CNA a fee to be listed on the Registry.

4. I am a CNA trained in Maine: what do I have to do to get on the Registry? Show/Hide

You must submit the following: (A) a completed application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained in Maine; (B) documentation of successful completion of Maines approved CNA training program within the last two years; (C) documentation of successful completion of the Maine CNA competency test; (D) a copy of your Certificate of Training; and (E) a copy of the criminal background check that was secured by your instructor as part of your course application. You must have no employment restrictions based on criminal convictions or substantiated complaints that bar you from working as a CNA in Maine.

5. I am a CNA trained out-of-state: what do I have to do to get on the Registry? Show/Hide

You must submit the following: (A) a completed application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained out-of-state; (B) documentation verifying completion of an approved out-of-state CNA training program; (C) a copy of the Certificate of Training or similar document that identifies the dates of the training and the number of classroom and clinical hours of training; (D) documentation of successful completion of the out-of-state CNA competency test; (E) documentation of completion of at least the ninth grade; and (F) official documented proof of employment as a CNA for at least 32 hours per week for 3 out of the past 5 years. You must have no employment restrictions based on criminal convictions or substantiated complaints that bar you from working as a CNA in Maine.

6. I was a CNA [or its equivalent] while serving in the United States Armed Services: what do I have to do to get on the Registry? Show/Hide

You must submit the following: (A) a completed application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained out-of-state; (B) documentation verifying successful completion of medical training or work in the military that is equivalent to Maines approved CNA training program; (C) documentation that identifies the dates of the equivalent training or equivalent work, and the number of classroom and clinical hours of equivalent training or equivalent work; and (D) documentation of completion of at least the ninth grade. You must successfully complete Maines CNA competency test. CNAs on active duty must submit a copy of their training certificate (examples: Army 91 A, B, or C; Air Force Medical Specialist; or Navy Hospital Corpsman). CNAs not on active duty, must submit a copy of their DD214, or similar official document. You must have no employment restrictions based on criminal convictions or substantiated complaints that bar you from working as a CNA in Maine.

7. I am a nursing school student: what do I have to do to get on the Registry?Show/Hide

Current or former students of a Maine, or out-of-state, nursing school who want to work as a CNA in Maine must send the Registry a certificate of equivalent training issued by the director of the school of nursing, and a completed application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained in Maine or application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained out-of-state;

8. I am a nurse: what do I have to do to get on the Registry? Show/Hide

9.In another country, I was trained as a nurse: what do I have to do to get on the Maine CNA Registry? Show/Hide

You must submit the following: (A) a completed application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained out-of-state; (B) a copy of your diploma, degree, or transcripts (diploma, degree or transcripts must be in English); (C) a copy of a criminal background check; (D) a copy of your visa; and (E) a copy of your COGFNS information.

10. I am a trained emergency medical technician (EMT), may I work as a CNA? Show/Hide

Not until you have satisfactorily completed Maines approved CNA training program; Maines CNA competency test; and submitted a completed application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained in Maine will you be considered for placement on the Maine CNA Registry. Only CNAs listed on the Registry may work as a CNA in Maine.

11. I have no documentation to prove that I completed an out-of-state CNA training program but I have been a CNA for many years: what do I have to do to get on the Registry? Show/Hide

You must satisfactorily complete Maines approved CNA training program; Maines CNA competency test; and submit a completed application form for placement on the Registry for CNAs trained out-of-state before you may be considered for placement on the Maine CNA Registry if you cannot document your original out-of-state training hours.

12. Is there a minimum age requirement for CNAs in Maine? Show/Hide

Yes. 16 years old.

13. Do I have to be a high school graduate to be a CNA in Maine? Show/Hide

No, but you do have to provide documented proof that you completed the ninth grade of school.

14. How long does it take to get on the Registry? Show/Hide

The Registry has 30 days to determine your eligibility for placement on the Registry after receiving your completed application form and all required documentation.

15. Will the Registry notify me when they make a decision about placing me on the Registry? Show/Hide

Yes. You will receive a letter confirming the date you are approved for placement on the Registry. Keep this letter with your important papers. This letter also will indicate the date your listing expires unless you submit a renewal form. You may visit the CNA Registry web-portal to confirm your placement on the Registry.

16. What are the minimum requirements to stay active on the Registry? Show/Hide

There are three. (1) You must complete a minimum of at least 8 hours of qualified employment every 24 months; (2) You must have no disqualifying annotations; and (3) you must renew your CNA Registry listing every 24 months. Failure to meet any one of these requirements bars you from working as a CNA in Maine.

17. I am moving to another state: what do I do to get on their state CNA Registry? Show/Hide

Contact the CNA Registry in that state to find out what their requirements are for placement on their Registry. For contact information, go to the National Directory of Nurse Aide Registries (pdf*). A reciprocity form may be required. A reciprocity form confirms your status on the Maine CNA Registry and should facilitate your transfer to another state Registry.

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Renewing Your Listing on the Registry

18. How often do I have to renew my listing on the Registry? Show/Hide

You must renew your listing on the CNA Registry every 24 months by submitting a completed renewal form with all the required documents. Failure to renew your listing bars you from working as a CNA in Maine.

19. Will I receive a reminder to renew my listing? Show/Hide

Yes. Thirty to sixty days prior to the expiration of your listing, the Registry shall send a reminder to the address we have in your file. Please make sure the Registry always has your current address. It is your responsibility to renew your listing on the CNA Registry before it expires if you want to continue working as a CNA in Maine.

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CNA Training Requirements

20. How many hours of training does Maine require? Show/Hide

Maines approved training program requires a minimum of 180 hours of training. If you were trained in another state, you must provide documentation that you received an equivalent amount of approved out-of-state CNA training.

21. What are CNAs allowed to do? Show/Hide

CNAs, under the supervision of a registered professional nurse, are allowed to perform any nursing service on the Official CNA Skills List after they have satisfactorily demonstrated their ability to do so.

22. Are CNAs allowed to give medication? Show/Hide

No, unless they become a CNA-M (a certified nursing assistant medication aide) by satisfactorily completing the Standardized Medication Course for Certified Nursing Assistants.

23. Are CNAs allowed to do private duty work? Show/Hide

CNAs are only allowed to work under the supervision of a registered professional nurse.

24. In Maine, where may I take a CNA course or competency test? Show/Hide

Visit the Department of Education webpage or phone them at (207) 624-6711 for information about a location near you for Maines approved training program, Maines CNA competency test, or Maines CNA Bridge Examination

25. Are there annual training requirements to stay active on the Registry? Show/Hide

Only CNAs employed by nursing facilities are required to submit documentation of completed in-service education when they renew their listing on the CNA Registry.

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Bridge Examination for CNAs Trained Out-of-State

26. Which CNAs trained out-of-state are eligible to take the Maine CNA Bridge Examination? Show/Hide

A CNA who has completed an approved out-of-state CNA training program that was at least 100 hours in length but less than the hours required by Maines approved CNA training program, may be eligible to take the Maines CNA Bridge Examination.

27. What is a passing grade for the Maine Bridge Examination? Show/Hide

The multiple-choice section of the examination requires a passing grade of 70 and the clinical component requires you to perform 7 of 10 tasks correctly.

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Criminal Background checks

28. Will the Registry notify me if a criminal background check shows I have criminal convictions? Show/Hide

Yes. The Registry will send you a letter stating that there are convictions that will be placed on the Registry as either non-disqualifying annotations or disqualifying annotations.

29. What should I do if I think the criminal background information is wrong? Show/Hide

Email the CNA Registry or phone them at 207-624-7300 stating the reasons you think the information is wrong.

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Annotations on the Registry

30. What is an annotation? Show/Hide

An annotation is information on the Registry about criminal convictions and substantiated complaints. There are 2 kinds of annotations: non-disqualifying annotations and disqualifying annotations.

31. What is a non-disqualifying annotation? Show/Hide

A non-disqualifying annotation is information about you on the Registry concerning criminal convictions of Class D or Class E crimes that do not prohibit you from working as a CNA in Maine. There is an exception: when the victim of the Class D or Class E crime was a patient, client or resident in a health care setting, you may not work as a CNA.

32. What is a disqualifying annotation? Show/Hide

A "disqualifying annotation is information about you on the Registry that prohibits you from working as a CNA in Maine. Disqualifying annotations include: (A) substantiated complaints of abuse, neglect, or misappropriation of property in a health care setting; (B) convictions for crimes when the victim was a patient, client or resident in a health care setting: (C) convictions within the previous 10 years of Class A, B, or C crimes; (D) convictions within the previous 10 years of sex assault crimes; and (E) convictions within the previous 10 years of crimes: involving abuse, neglect, or misappropriation of property.

33. How long do annotations stay on my record on the Registry? Show/Hide

That depends.

  1. Substantiated complaint annotations for abuse and misappropriation of property stay on your record permanently.
  2. A one-time neglect annotation that is the result of a complaint investigation may be removed from your record if your petition for removal of a finding of neglect is successful. Otherwise, substantiated complaints for neglect stay on your record permanently.
  3. Annotations for Class D or Class E crimes are removed from your record on the Registry 10 years after the date you were convicted. There is an exception: if the victim of a Class D or Class E crime was a patient, client or resident of a health care setting, the annotation stays on your record permanently.

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Petition to remove an Annotation of Neglect

34. I have an annotation for neglect: how do I file a petition to have it removed from my record on the Registry? Show/Hide

You must send the Registry a completed Petition for Removal of a Finding of Neglect form. CNAs with a one-time finding of neglect may petition for removal 12 months after the date the finding of neglect was entered on the Maine Registry, if the finding of neglect was a singular occurrence and the employment and personal history of the CNA does not reflect a pattern of abusive behavior or neglect.

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Employment Restrictions

35. Are there any employment restrictions? Show/Hide

Yes. Some criminal convictions, and any substantiated complaint of abuse, neglect, or misappropriation of property, prohibit employment as a CNA in Maine.

36. Are there any exceptions to the employment restrictions? Show/Hide

Yes. There are 2 exceptions:.

  1. Convictions that occurred before June 1, 2003, are not subject to employment restrictions if [1] you were listed on the Registry prior to June 1, 2003 and [2] you have continued to maintain an active status on the Registry. As long as you remain on the Registry and continue to meet all other CNA requirements, you may work as a CNA. If you are convicted of a crime after June 1, 2003 that results in a disqualifying annotation on your record on the Registry, you will be removed from the registry and you may not work as a CNA in Maine.
  2. Convictions for a Class D or Class E crime are not employment restrictions and are not included on the Registry if the conviction is at least 10 years old and the victim was not a patient, client, or resident of a health care setting. If the Class D or Class E conviction is less than 10 years old, it will be listed on the Registry as a non-disqualifying annotation. You may work as a CNA when you have non-disqualifying annotations.

37. What convictions are employment restrictions? Show/Hide

The following criminal convictions are employment restrictions:

  1. Convictions for crimes involving abuse, neglect, or misappropriation of property that occurred in a health care setting, including Class D and Class E crimes when the victim was a patient, client, or resident of a health care facility.
  2. Convictions, within the last 10 years, for crimes for which incarceration of three [3] years or more may be imposed under the laws of the state in which the conviction occurred.
  3. Convictions, within the last 10 years, of the following named crimes:
    1. sex assaults; or
    2. crimes involving abuse, neglect or exploitation in a setting other than a health care setting for which incarceration of less than 3 years may be imposed under the laws of the state in which the conviction occurred.

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Substantiated Complaints

38. What is a substantiated complaint? Show/Hide

A substantiated complaint is a complaint involving abuse, neglect or misappropriation of property that was verified after an investigation by state surveyors. Substantiated complaints are entered on the CNA Registry as disqualifying annotations.

39. Are all substantiated complaints employment restrictions? Show/Hide

Yes. Substantiated complaints of abuse, neglect or misappropriation of property are employment restrictions that prohibit employment as a CNA or as an unlicensed assistive person (UAP).

40. Will I be notified if a complaint against me is substantiated? Show/Hide

Yes, the Registry will send you a letter stating that a complaint against you was substantiated.

41. How do I appeal the substantiated complaint decision if I disagree with it? Show/Hide

You must submit a completed request a hearing form to the CNA Registry within 30 days after you receive the Registrys letter. You must specify the reasons why you disagree with the decision and why you want to appeal. Fax or mail the request a hearing form to the CNA Registry: fax it to 207-287-9325; or send by postal mail to: CNA Registry, attn: Paralegal, 41 Anthony Avenue, 11 State House Station, Augusta, Maine 04333.

42. If I cannot work as a CNA in Maine because of employment restrictions, may I work as an unlicensed assistive person (UAP)? Show/Hide

No. A CNA with employment restrictions is barred from employment as a UAP.

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Fraudulent Applications

43. What is a fraudulent application? Show/Hide

An application is fraudulent when an individual knowingly submits an application form or renewal form that contains misrepresentations concerning qualification for listing on the CNA Registry or in any way attempts to obtain placement on the Registry by deceitful or fraudulent means.

44. What happens if a fraudulent application is sent to the Registry? Show/Hide

The Registry will deny the fraudulent application. Anyone who was placed on the Registry based on a fraudulent application shall be removed from the active list of the Registry.

45. Will I be notified if the Registry decides that I submitted a fraudulent application? Show/Hide

Yes, the Registry will send you a letter stating the basis for their finding that you submitted a fraudulent application and that you have 30 days if you want to request a hearing to appeal the Registrys decision.

46. How do I appeal the Registrys decision that I submitted a fraudulent application, if I disagree? Show/Hide

You must submit a completed request a hearing form to the CNA Registry within 30 days after you receive the Registrys letter. You must specify the reasons why you disagree with the decision and why you want to appeal. Fax or mail the request a hearing form to the CNA Registry: fax it to 207-287-9325; or send by postal mail to: CNA Registry, attn: Paralegal, 41 Anthony Avenue, 11 State House Station, Augusta, Maine 04333.

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Petition for Reinstatement After Fraudulent Application

47. How and when may I file a petition for reinstatement? Show/Hide

Twelve (12) months after the date it was documented on the CNA Registry that you were either denied listing or removed from the Registry for submitting a fraudulent application, you may fax or mail the petition for reinstatement form to the CNA Registry: fax it to 207-287-9325; or send it by postal mail to: CNA Registry, attn: Paralegal, 41 Anthony Avenue, 11 State House Station, Augusta, Maine 04333.

48. What are the requirements for reinstatement? Show/Hide

The CNA must demonstrate that the denial of listing, or the removal from the Registry, was based on only one application or renewal that resulted in a finding of misrepresentation, deceit or fraud.

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CNA-Medication Aide (CNA-M)

49. What is a CNA-M? Show/Hide

A CNA-M is an experienced CNA who has completed additional training to administer selected noninjectable medications to patients who are 4 years of age and older.

50. What are the requirements for a CNA to become a CNA-M? Show/Hide

The Maine State Board of Nursing rules (Word*)established the following requirements. A CNA must:

  1. be listed on the Maine CNA Registry with no disqualifying annotations;
  2. have completed at least the equivalent of one year of full-time employment as a CNA;
  3. achieve the tenth grade competency level on the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE), or other competency assessment mechanisms as approved by the Maine State Board of Nursing ; and
  4. satisfactorily complete the Maine State Board of Nursing Standardized Medication Course for Certified Nursing Assistants.

51. How do I become a CNA-M? Show/Hide

You send the CNA Registry a completed CNA-M application form along with the required documentation. The Registry evaluates your application and the Maine State Board of Nursing makes the decision to approve or deny your application.

52. What is required to maintain my CNA-M status? Show/Hide

Two things are required. You must: (A) maintain an active status on the CNA Registry with no disqualifying annotations; and (B) comply with the mechanism for maintaining competency provided by the health care facility that employs you to work as a CNA-M (for details, speak to your employer).

53. May a student nurse work as a CNA-M? Show/Hide

No, unless the student nurse received a certificate of equivalent training and satisfactorily completed the Standardized Medication Course for Certified Nursing Assistants approved by the Maine State Board of Nursing. There is no acceptable substitute training for the CNA-M course.

54. What is the difference between a CNA-M and a CRMA? Show/Hide

They learn different skills. Certified residential medication aides (CRMAs) must be able to transcribe physician orders and complete medication administration records because CRMAs do not work under the supervision of a registered professional nurse. CNA-Ms do.

Chart #54 Differences between a CNA-M and a CRMA

Name CNA-M CRMA
Satisfactorily completed the Maine approved CNA training prior to taking the medication course. X  
Course includes 60 hours of classroom instruction, 20 hours of skills laboratory and 40 hours of correlated supervised clinical practice. X  
May work in a number of settings, including nursing facilities. X  
Course includes 35 to 45 hours of classroom training, including training in the transcription of physician orders, passing medication, and completing medication administration records.   X
Trained to transcribe physician orders   X
Trained to complete medication administration records   X
Works without the direct on-site supervision of a registered professional nurse.   X
May work only in a residential care facility    

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