Maine Economics and Demographics Publications

OPM reports:

2014 Average Personal Income Growth Factor

With the passage of “LD 1” in 2005, towns and counties are required to calculate a property tax levy limit each year based on local property growth and statewide average personal income growth. Each town and county is responsible for calculating its property growth. The Office of Policy and Management (OPM) is responsible for calculating income growth. For the 2013 property tax year (the 2014 budget year for most towns), OPM has determined that figure to be 1.09%. Read the full release for more information and calculations.

Maine city and town population outlook to 2030

The Governor's Office of Policy and Management has released 2015-2030 population projections for cities and towns.

Maine state and county population outlook to 2030

The Governor's Office of Policy and Management has released 2015-2030 population projections for the state and counties.

Tax burden reduction (LD 1) report issued

The Office of Policy and Management released the 2012 edition of its annual report on progress made toward the tax burden reduction goal established by PL 2005, chapter 2 (also known as LD 1).

2013 Average Personal Income Growth Factor

With the passage of “LD 1” in 2005, towns and counties are required to calculate a property tax levy limit each year based on local property growth and statewide average personal income growth. Each town and county is responsible for calculating its property growth. The Office of Policy and Management (OPM) is responsible for calculating income growth. For the 2012 property tax year (the 2013 budget year for most towns), OPM has determined that figure to be 1.05%. Read the full release for more information and calculations.

Tax burden reduction (LD1) report issued

The State Planning Office released the 2011 edition of its annual report on progress made toward the tax burden reduction goal established by PL 2005, chapter 2 (also known as LD 1).

2012 Average Personal Income Growth Factor

With the passage of “LD 1” in 2005, towns and counties are required to calculate a property tax levy limit each year based on local property growth and statewide average personal income growth. Each town and county is responsible for calculating its property growth. The State Planning Office (SPO) is responsible for calculating income growth. For the 2011 property tax year (the 2012 budget year for most towns), SPO has determined that figure to be 1.43%. Read the full release for more information and calculations.

Tax burden reduction (LD1) report issued

The State Planning Office released its report in accordance with PL 2005, chapter 2 (also known as LD 1). Under this statute, SPO annually reports on the progress made by the state, counties, municipalities, and school administrative units toward reaching the legislated tax burden reduction goal.

2011 LD 1 Average Personal Income Growth Factor

With the passage of “LD 1” in 2005, towns and counties are required to calculate a property tax levy limit each year based on local property growth and statewide average personal income growth. Each town and county is responsible for calculating its property growth. The State Planning Office (SPO) is responsible for calculating income growth. For the 2010 property tax year (the 2011 budget year for most towns), SPO has determined that figure to be 1.66%. Read the full release for more information and calculations.

Coastline population trends, 1960-2008

Maine has 5,300 miles of coastline with iconic rocky beaches, lighthouses, and island views. Coastal Maine’s physical features have remained much the same over time. But what about the population?

Youth migration summary

There are persistent concerns about the departure of young people from the state. As we await the Census 2010 population count, we can consider what we might see in terms of youth migration. There are a few ways of looking at currently available estimates that can give an indication of what has been happening since the last decennial count.

2009 population estimates show loss

Maine’s population of about 1.3 million just did something rare these days: it declined. According to estimates by the US Census Bureau Maine lost about one tenth of one percent of its population between 2008 and 2009.

Economic role of service centers in Maine

Maine has almost five hundred municipalities, but most of them are places where people live, not places where people work. The vast majority of goods and services transactions are concentrated in 77 municipalities defined as Service Centers by the Maine State Planning Office. This Economics team briefing compares Service Center municipalities to other municipalities in Maine.

Maine's families and living arrangements

The Maine State Data Center has compiled a report detailing the dramatic changes in Maine's households over the past few decades. These changes have profound implications for the way Maine people interact, live, and solve problems together. These also present an opportunity to create public policies that encourage denser, more efficient land-use planning.

Employment patterns of Somali immigrants to Lewiston

In 2001, large numbers of Somali immigrants began moving to the Lewiston/Auburn area. While some came directly to Lewiston from Somalia, many others came from large cities in the United States. They came to Maine for the same reasons that many people move here: the quality of life and strong family values that make the state a good place to raise a family. The Lewiston/Auburn community has experienced some growing pains while taking in this new population. Employment has been one of the key issues.

Public access to Maine's private lands: A cultural and economic asset

This paper has four sections. First is a brief discussion of the economic role that private land owners play by allowing access to their land. Next is a review of the common reasons why landowners restrict access to their land. Public policy solutions will need to address these reasons in order to be successful. The third section is an overview of programs available in Maine and elsewhere to incent landowners to continue to allow public access. And finally, recommendations are suggested that may be effective in continuing, expanding, and improving public access to private land in Maine.

Are the economics of a sustainable Maine forest sustainable?

Mike LeVert, Charles Colgan and Charles Lawton discuss the transformation of the economic environment of Maine’s forests over the past two decades. Paper companies have sold most of their holdings; residential and conservation demand for land has increased; forestland prices have skyrocketed; and new classes of landowners have different strategies, objectives, and time horizons than the old industrial landowners. The authors believe that management of Maine’s forests must now address changes in the economic environment with the same intensity as threats such as the spruce budworm were addressed if we are to keep Maine’s forests as forests.

Maine's aging population: A survey of potential economic implications

The phenomenon of Maine’s aging population is often wondered about, but seldom thoroughly investigated. As the impending demographic change approaches, it becomes increasingly important to identify potential implications for Maine’s economy. On a broad scale, this report represents an integrated collection of the research that various academic scholars and policymakers have already done on the issue of population aging, both in the U.S. and Maine. It does not offer any new analysis, but rather serves to catalogue the ideas people have already begun thinking about in the hope that it will aid others to recognize areas that will require additional attention as Maine prepares to age successfully.

Understanding the impact of closing Naval Air Station Brunswick

The closure of Naval Air Station Brunswick (NASB) will give a new face to the mid-coast Maine communities that have hosted military personnel and their families for years. Businesses will look for new customers; base workers will change jobs; landlords will advertise for new tenants; and everyone will contemplate potential reuses of the base. In short, the entire community will feel the change. The closure will also bring opportunities. Research shows that most communities facing a military base closure recover after an initial adjustment period. Some even experience enhanced economic growth when military facilities are successfully converted to civilian use.

Maine youth migration profiles, 1995-2000

Prepared for REALIZE!Maine: This paper explores the characteristics of young people aged 20-34 who moved from Maine, to Maine, and within Maine over the period 1995-2000. The paper uses data from the 2000 census to provide a more detailed picture of the age, employment, income, locational and educational characteristics of young people who moved during this period.

Maine's changing population: A summary of structural changes, mobility, and regional variations

Report for REALIZE!Maine: Young adults are the most mobile segment of the population. Where they live is influenced not only by where they have ties to family and friends, but also by their career choices, their choice of college to attend, their desire to experience different lifestyles, and their sense of adventure and desire to explore that which lies beyond their door. Concern that Maine is losing its youngest citizens has become widespread. Indeed, Maine’s population growth has lagged behind the nation since the early 1990s. There are fewer young adults today age 20-34, and the proportion of children and young adults as a percent of Maine’s population is declining.

A brief history of the Maine economy

Maine's coastal geography and abundance of natural resources vital to the nation's development led to early settlement and rapid population and economic growth. When those resources become less vital following the Civil War, however, Maine's growth slowed markedly and remains slow today. But, because Maine was not spoiled by continuous rapid growth, the State's current tourism campaign can boast of "Maine -- the way life should be!"

Poverty Reports

Each year since 1998, the Maine Office of Policy and Management has reported on the subject of poverty in Maine. 2012 Report on Poverty

Each year since 1998, the Maine State Planning Office has reported on the subject of poverty in Maine. The 2012 report (PDF) contains indicators updated through November 2011. Released January 2012.

2011 report on poverty

Each year since 1998, the Maine State Planning Office has reported on the subject of poverty in Maine. The 2010 report (PDF) contains indicators updated through November 2010. Released January 2011.

2010 report on poverty

Each year since 1998, the Maine State Planning Office has reported on the subject of poverty in Maine. The 2010 report (PDF) contains indicators updated through December 2008. Released January 2010.

2009 report on poverty

Each year since 1998, the Maine State Planning Office has reported on the subject of poverty in Maine. The 2009 report (PDF) contains indicators updated through December 2007.

2008 report on poverty

2007 report on poverty

2005 report on poverty

2003 report on poverty

2002 report on poverty

2001 report on poverty

2000 report on poverty

1999 report on poverty

1998 report on poverty